Maps

1507 Waldseemüller, Martin [1]

1507 Waldseemüller, Martin [1] – Universalis cosmographia secundum Ptolomaei traditionem et Americi Verpucii aliorumque lustrationes, Saint-Dié [Castle of Wolfegg, Württemberg]

Western half of Waldseemüller`s wall map. Little more than the eastern coastlines of North and South America, and some Caribbean islands, were known at that time. Waldseemüller believed that Amerigo Vespucci had discovered the new continent, and named it after him. The word America can be found in the lower third of the southern continent.

1507 Waldseemüller, Martin [2]

1507 Waldseemüller, Martin [2] – Universalis cosmographia secundum Ptolomaei traditionem et Americi Verpucii aliorumque lustrationes, Saint-Dié [Castle of Wolfegg, Württemberg].

In addition to his famous large 1507 wall map of the entire world (see Waldseemüller, Martin [1]), he also created in the same year the first globe of the earth. The image shown here represents the part of the globe gores which have the name America printed across a portion of South America. [431aa]

1525-27 Salviati Map

1525-27 Salviati Map – Original in Reale Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, Florence; size 95×205 cm.
Shown here is the map detail demonstrating the dividing line between Spanish and Portuguese influence in the New World based on the 1494 Treaty of Tordesillas.

1540 Münster, Sebastian

1540 Münster, Sebastian – Novae Insvlae, XVII Nova Tabvla [reedition: Ptolemy’s Geographia], Basel [Service historique de la Marine, Vincennes].

Sebastian Muenster’s 1540 wood engraving map of the New World, showing the St. Lawrence river inlet behind an early version of Newfoundland [named Corterati]. What is to become Canada is named Francisca in honor of the French King François I.

1553 Nicolai, Nicolas de

1553 Nicolai, Nicolas de – Novveau Monde, navigational chart; Paris [Bibliothèque Nationale]

A portion of Nicolas de Nicolai`s 1553 navigational chart, incorporating many details of Cartier`s 1534-35 exploration of the St. Lawrence River and Gulf [upper third of image]. The land to the north he calls Labrador. [94]

1562 Gutiérrez, Diego

1562 Gutiérrez, Diego – Americae · Sive Quartae Orbis Partis Nova et Exactissima Description.

1570 Ortelius, Abraham

1570 Ortelius, Abraham – Americae sive Novis Orbis, Nova Descriptio, Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, Antwerp [Newberry Library, Chicago].

Northeast portion of Abraham Ortelius’ 1570 map of America. Geographic knowledge of the coastal region is growing rapidly. No hint yet of the Great Lakes of the interior. The mythical region of [see] Chilaga near the upper reaches of the St. Lawrence River is shown. [94]

1607 Wytfliet, Cornelis van

1607 Wytfliet, Cornelis van – Histoire universelledes Indes occidentales (et orientales). Nouvellement traduict. Douai, Fabri, 1607; Folio, with 19 copper engraved plates.

The cropped image shown here is from the 1607 reprint of the original issue which was published in 1597 as Descripionis Ptolomaicae augmentum, which was the first atlas entirely devoted to America.

Note that the St. Lawrence River is prominently shown, while the Mississippi River is not yet known in its full extent. The name [see] Chilaga, a corruption of the native name Hochelaga [`beaver dam-at`] for Montreal, is distinctly shown.

1612 Champlain, Samuel de

1612 Champlain, Samuel de – Carte Geographiqve de la Nouvelle Franse, Les Voyages du Sieur de Champlain, Paris, 1613 [Newberry Library, Chicago] eastern half.

Samuel de Champlain’s map of 1612, based on his own explorations, and the first to indicate the existence of a chain of great lakes west of the upper St. Lawrence River. In the years to follow, as governor of Nouvelle Franse, his maps become more detailed and accurate. [94]

1612 Champlain, Samuel de

1612 Champlain, Samuel de – Carte Geographiqve de la Nouvelle Franse, Les Voyages du Sieur de Champlain, Paris, 1613 [Newberry Library, Chicago] western half.

1650 Sanson d`Abbeville, Nicolas

1650 Sanson d`Abbeville, Nicolas – Excerpt of his map LE CANADA , ou NOUVELLE FRANCE, &c;…, drawn in 1650 and printed in 1656 in Paris. Lake Superior and Lake Illinois are still incompletely known, the latter named Lac de Puans [Winnebago]. Lake Huron is named Karegnondi.

1655 Du Val, Pierre

1655 Du Val, Pierre – Amerique/Autrement/Nouveau Monde/et Indes Occidentales/Par P. Du Val d`Abbeuille/Geographe Ordinai du Roy …, Paris [Bibliothèque Nationale].

This portion of Pierre Du Val`s 1655 map of America shows that all five Great Lakes are known, with the western shores of Lake Superior and Lake Michigan not yet delineated. Du Val, son-in-law of the cartographer Nicolas Sanson, borrowed much from his famous teacher, but in this instance surpasses him in clarity of arrangement. Lake Huron is called Mer douce [“sweet sea”]; the other lakes are unnamed, although Sanson`s 1656 map will label Lakes Superior, Erie, and Ontario with the names used today, though Lake Michigan is still Lac de Puans. [94]

1669 Marquette, Père Jacques and Allouez, Père Claude Jean

1669 Marquette, Père Jacques and Allouez, Père Claude Jean – Lac Tracy ou Superievr et avtres lievx ou sont les Missions des Pères de la Compagnie de Iesvs Comprises sovs le nom D`ovtaovacs; Paris [Service historique de la Marine, Vincennes].

This manuscript map was a template for the engraving which was printed within the Jesuit Relations · 1670-1671 in Paris. [105aa, 464c]

1671 Marquette, Père Jacques and Allouez, Père Claude Jean

1671 Marquette, Père Jacques and Allouez, Père Claude Jean – Lac Superievr et avtres lievx ou sont les Missions des Pères de la Compagnie de Iesvs Comprises sovs le nom D`ovtaovacs, Jesuit Relations · 1670-1671; Paris, 1672 [Newberry Library, Chicago].

1673 Marquette, Père Jacques

1673 Marquette, Père Jacques – holograph represented [Archives de la Compagnie de Jésus, St. Jérôme, Quebec].

1674 Manitoumie II

1674 Manitoumie II – This map excerpt shows with considerable detail and accuracy the Chicago portage region with Mud Lake and the Chicago and Des Plaines rivers. [Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris] See entries in the Encyclopedia section for Manitoumie and Thévenot`s map.

1674 Jolliet, Louis

1674 Jolliet, Louis – Carte de la descouverte/du Sr Jolliet ou l`on voit la communcation/du Fleuve St Laurens avec les Lacs Frontenac/Erié, Lac des Hurons, et Ilinois …, Vincennes [Service historique de la Marine].

1681 Thévenot, Melchisédech

1681 Thévenot, Melchisédech – Carte de la decouverte faite l`an 1673 dans l`Amerique Septentrionale, Recueil de Voyages; Paris [Newberry Library, Chicago].

Melchisédech Thévenot, Paris-based French scholar and chronicler of explorations in the New World, published the first map to mark the Jolliet-Marquette discoveries of 1673, and also the earliest to attach the name Michigan (Michigami) to one of the Great Lakes in 1681.

1683 Louis de Hennepin

1683 Louis de Hennepin – (1640–c.1705) born in Belgium; became a Catholic priest and missionary of the Franciscan Récollet order and an explorer of the interior of North America, arriving in 1675; traveled with La Salle on the 1679-81 expedition, during which time he is known to have passed through the Chicagou site. Shown here is a detail from his map Carte d’un tres grand pais nouvellement decouvert dans l`Amerique Septentrionale, Utrecht [G. Broedelet]. Also see his later map of 1697, and his entry in the Encyclopedia section; eds. [13]

1684 Franquelin, Jean-Baptiste Louis

1684 Franquelin, Jean-Baptiste Louis – Carte de la Louisiane ou de Voyages du Sr. de la Salle &c;.

The original map is said to have been lost. Only copies can be found in the literature. On this facsimile detail the Chicago River is shown with its two branches, its mouth being named Cheagoumeman; what is now known as the Kankakee River is named R. Checagou; La Salle’s Fort St. Louis [du Rocher], built in 1681 by La Salle, and Fort Crevecoeur, built in 1680 by La Salle and Tonti, are shown along the Illinois River; locations of numerous tribal villages are marked, accompanied by estimated numbers of their inhabitants.

1686 Franquelin, Jean-Baptiste Louis

1686 Franquelin, Jean-Baptiste Louis – Amerique Septentrionale [Service historique de la Marine, Vincennes].

This map detail depicts the southern half of Lake Michigan; the first map ever to show and name the Chicagou settlement, placing it on the west bank of the south branch of the Chicago River.

1688 Coronelli, Vincento Maria

1688 Coronelli, Vincento Maria – Partie Occidentale/du Canada ou de la Nouvelle/France/ou sont les Nations des Ilinois, de Tracy, les/Iroquois, et plusiers autres Peuples;/ Avec la Louisiane Nouvellement decouverte etc. …, Vincennes [Service historique de la Marine].

1688 Coronelli, Vincento Maria (version 2)

1688 Coronelli, Vincento Maria (version 2) – Partie occidentale du Canada ou de la Nouvelle France, Paris [J.B. Nolin].

1688 Franquelin, Jean-Baptiste Louis

1688 Franquelin, Jean-Baptiste Louis – Carte de L’Amerique Septentrionale … En l’Annee 1688.

The original is located in the Service historique de la Marine, Vincennes, France. Another version of Franquelin’s 1688 map can be found in Robert A. Holland’s book Chicago in Maps – 1612-2002.

1688 Franquelin, Jean-Baptiste Louis (version 2)

1688 Franquelin, Jean-Baptiste Louis (version 2) – Courtesy of the Illinois State Museum. [417a]

1697 Hennepin, Louis de

1697 Hennepin, Louis de – (1640–c.1705) born in Belgium; became a Catholic priest and missionary of the Franciscan Récollet order and an explorer of the interior of North America, arriving in 1675; traveled with La Salle on the 1679-81 expedition, during which time he is known to have passed through the Chicagou site. Represented here is a detail from his map Carte d’un tres grand pais nouvellement decouvert dans l`Amerique Septentrionale, Utrecht. Also see his earlier map of 1683, and his entry in the Encyclopedia section; eds. [13]

1697 Louvigny, Louis de la Porte de

1697 Louvigny, Louis de la Porte de – Carte du Fleuue Missisipi auec les Noms des peuples qui L`habitent et des Etablissements des Espagnols et Anglois qui en sont proches par de la porte de louuign[y], Vincennes [Service historique de la Marine]

Shown here is the Illinois River and Lake Michigan detail of this map [see entry on Louvigny for further detail].

1703 Delisle, Guillaume

1703 Delisle, Guillaume – (1675–1726) French geographer, working for Louis XV. He is often named the founder of modern cartography. Represented here is a detail from his 1703 map. See also his later map of 1718. [13]

1718 Delisle, Guillaume

1718 Delisle, Guillaume – (1675–1726) French geographer, working for Louis XV. He is often named the founder of modern cartography. Detail from Delisle`s 1718 map, Carte de la Louisiane et du Cours du Mississippi, Paris [Newberry Library, Chicago], showing Chicagou and both branches of the Chicago River, with settlement or Indian village on each branch. The Des Plaines River is called Chicagou R. See also his earlier map of 1703. [605]

1733 Popple, Henry

1733 Popple, Henry – A detail of a map represented from Popple`s atlas America Septentrionalis, London. [13]

1744 Bellin, Jacques Nicolas

1744 Bellin, Jacques Nicolas – Carte des Lacs du Canada, in Journal d`un Voyage Fait par Ordre du Roi dans l`Amerique Septentrionale, Pierre F.X. De Charlevoix; Paris [Newberry Library, Chicago].

This Chicago area detail of the map shows a Chicago Portage ambiguously connecting the Des Plaines River with the north branch of the Chicago River. While the major so called Portage aux chênes started from the south branch, there indeed existed two lesser portages between the north branch and the Des Plaines.

1755 D’Anville, Jean-Baptiste Bourguignon

1755 D’Anville, Jean-Baptiste Bourguignon – (1697-1782) French geographer and cartographer who greatly improved the standards of making maps. Represented here is a detail of his map of North America. [13]

1755 Mitchell, John

1755 Mitchell, John – (1711-1768) born to an affluent Virginian family and educated in medicine in Scotland, afterward developed an interest in cartography. His first draft of this map in 1750 brought him to the attention of the Board of Trade and Plantations, which then employed Mitchell in the creation of a new map. In this capacity, Mitchell had access to the Board`s private collection of maps and reports; in addition, the Board instructed the colonial governors to provide him with detailed maps and boundary information. Mitchell`s new map, of which a Chicago area section is represented here, was published in 1755 by the London publisher Andrew Millar, and was titled A Map of the/British and French Dominions/in North America, …, London [Newberry Library, Chicago]. [13]

1755 Vaugondy, Robert de

1755 Vaugondy, Robert de – (1688-1766 a French cartographer, born in Paris. He used Sanson`s plates and also acquired plates of Jaillot; his major work was the beautiful Atlas Universel first issued in 1757. He died in 1766 at Paris. Shown here is a detail of his 1755 map La Nouvelle France ou Le Canada.

1761 Brehm, Lt. Dietrich

1761 Brehm, Lt. Dietrich – Chigago River and village, Public Records Office, London.

In 1761 the British military officer Lt. Dietrich Brehm visited Chicago while surveying and mapping the territory newly acquired from the French near the end of the French and Indian War. An excerpt of his map shows the “Chigago River and village,” and portrays with fair accuracy the portage, Mud Lake, and the Des Plaines and Illinois rivers.

1762 Lattré, Jean

1762 Lattré, Jean – This detail of Parisian engraver Lattré’s map shows how the border between Canada and Louisiana circumvented the southern end of Lake Michigan at a close distance, following the watershed. Thus the site of Chicago was within Canada, but the locations of many of its later suburbs, such as River Forest and La Grange Park, belonged to Louisiane. [William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor]

1766 Brion, M.

1766 Brion, M. – cartographer of the French King. Shown here is a detail of his 1766 map Nouveau Mexique, Louisiane, Canada, et Nouvelle Angleterre.

1774 Charlevoix, Pierre François

1774 Charlevoix, Pierre François – (1682-1761) a noted French historian who traveled on the Illinois River in 1721. The detail represented here is taken from a map in his Histoire de la Nouvelle France, published in 1774. [13]

1778 Hutchins, Thomas

1778 Hutchins, Thomas – map detail of the “Chikago” region from Hutchins` London 1778 publication A Topographical Description of Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and North Carolina, Comprehending the Rivers Ohio, Kenhawa, Sioto, Cherokee, Wabash, Illinois, Mississippi, &c.;. The name “Hid Island” crossing the Des Plaines River refers to what is now known as Isle a la Cache. [Chicago History Museum]

1785 Purcell, H.D.

1785 Purcell, H.D. – an excerpt of the first map showing the state names proposed by President Thomas Jefferson; was engraved and published in Bailey`s Pocket Almanac for 1785.

1790 Morse, Jedidiah

1790 Morse, Jedidiah – (1761-1826) Boston cartographer, who published American Geography in 1789, which was widely cited and copied. His textbooks for school-children earned him the informal title “father of American geography.” Presented here is a detail of the map showing the Chicago region. [13]

1795 Chicago Housing Map

1795 Chicago Housing Map – [Ulrich Danckers, 2000]

1798 Bradley, Abraham, Jr.

1798 Bradley, Abraham, Jr. – Map of the Northern Part of the United States of America, in Jedidiah Morse`s American Gazetteer.

1801 Carey, Matthew

1801 Carey, Matthew – (1786-1839) Dublin born cartographer and publisher who came to America in 1784 and, with Benjamin Franklin’s assistance, established a publishing house in Philadelphia. Represented here is a Chicago area detail of his 1801 map. [See also his maps of 1814 and 1818] [13].

1803 Chicago Housing Map

1803 Chicago Housing Map – [Ulrich Danckers, 2000]

1808 Chicago`s first public ferry location

1808 Chicago`s first public ferry location – This map shows the location of Chicago`s first public ferry, established across the North Branch — an “Indian Ferry attended by the man of this house [Capt. John Whistler]” to the east. [Ulrich Danckers, 2000]

1808 Indian Ferry

1808 Indian Ferry – A detail on Capt. John Whistler`s 1808 draft of Fort Dearborn I showing the location of the first public Chicago ferry.

1808 Whistler, Capt. John [1]

1808 Whistler, Capt. John [1] – Reproduction of the draught of Fort Dearborn, January 25, 1808. [National Archives, Washington, D.C.]. [682]

1808 Whistler, Capt. John [2]

1808 Whistler, Capt. John [2] – Detail from Capt. John Whistler`s January 25, 1808 draft of Fort Dearborn I. Anne Whistler, her husband and their many children occupied the log building (10) on the east side.

1809 Lewis, Cecilia Goold

1809 Lewis, Cecilia Goold – Sampler, Pleasant Valley, NY [Wisconsin Historical Society Collections, Madison].

The sampler was stitched on off-white silk, 19 by 22 1/2 inches.
The names of states and rivers are embroidered in very fine black silk. States and bodies of water are outlined by couching silk chenille.
Cecilia Lewis was born Jan. 12, 1791, in Flushing, NY; she may have never heard of Chicago.

1812 Chicago Housing Map [1], prior to the Fort Dearborn massacre

1812 Chicago Housing Map [1], prior to the Fort Dearborn massacre – [Ulrich Danckers, 2000]

1812 Chicago Housing Map [2], after the Fort Dearborn massacre

1812 Chicago Housing Map [2], after the Fort Dearborn massacre – [Ulrich Danckers, 2000]

1812 Juliette Kinzie

1812 Juliette Kinzie – An 1812 Chicago map created from interviews with survivors of the massacre and published by Juliette in 1844; reprinted in A Business Advertiser and General Directory of the City of Chicago for the Year 1845-6 by J. Wellington Norris. [405, 544]

1814 Carey, Mathew

1814 Carey, Mathew – (1786-1839) Dublin born cartographer and publisher who came to America in 1784 and, with Benjamin Franklin’s assistance, established a publishing house in Philadelphia. Represented here is a Chicago area detail of his 1814 map of the Northwest Territory

1816 Long, Maj. Stephen H.

1816 Long, Maj. Stephen H. – A Map/of the/Illenois River/from the Mouth to Gomo`s Village 200 miles/St. Louis September 20. [National Archives, Washington, D.C.]

This map detail shows the Chicago Portage region. The line N of Mudd Lake is the “portage road” followed by Major Long`s expedition; it crossed the Des Plaines River at what later became known as “Laughton`s Ford.”

1816 Melish, John

1816 Melish, John – Map of the United States with the Contiguous British & Spanish Possessions, Philadelphia [National Archives, Washington, D.C.].

1816 Sullivan, Capt. John C.

1816 Sullivan, Capt. John C. – Northern Boundary Illinois Bounty Lands. [National Archives, Washington, D.C.]
Sullivan`s survey established the “Indian boundery lines” negotiated in the 1816 Treaty at St. Louis.

1818 Carey, Matthew

1818 Carey, Matthew – (1786-1839) Dublin born cartographer and publisher who came to America in 1784 and, with Benjamin Franklin’s assistance, established a publishing house in Philadelphia. Represented here is a Chicago area detail of his 1818 map. [Also see his maps of 1801 and 1814] [13].

1818 Melish, John

1818 Melish, John – United Statesin Morris Birkbeck’s Letters from Illinois.

1818 Smith, Captain

1818 Smith, Captain – as a member of the U.S. Department of Engineering Cpt. Smith prepared this map of the Chicago River, from the confluence of its two major branches to its mouth, indicating the exact locations of Fort Dearborn and of the properties of Antoine Ouilmette and John Kinzie.

1821 Walls, John

1821 Walls, John – Survey of the Illinois & Michigan Canal Route with the Chicago River, Mud Lake and part of the DesPlaines; 18 June [U.S. General Land Office, Washington, D.C.].

1822 Rector, William

1822 Rector, William – Township 39 North of the baseline, Range 14 East of the 3rd principal meridian.

Included are the future site of the village of Chicago and the south branch of the Chicago River (waterways in blue, borders of woodland in green). A swamp is indicated S of the main part of the Chicago River. Sections 7, 17, 19, 21, 27, 29, 31 and 33 are designated as [see] Canal Land. A township includes 23,040 acres of land and is divided in 36 numbered sections, each one mile square. Because much of Township 39 is covered by Lake Michigan, the aggregate land acreage shown includes only 13,176.38 acres. [342a; Illinois State Archives, RS 953.012]

1822 Yaeger, Joseph

1822 Yaeger, Joseph – drawn four years after Illinois acquired statehood, this map demonstrates how sparcely the northeastern regions of the state were settled at that time. The subdivision into survey townships, as required by the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, would not reach the Chicago region until 1823 [see Fielding Lucas’ map]. The Indian Boundary Lines based on the Treaty of St. Louis of 1816, the village of Chicago and the Chicago portage are shown.

1823 Lucas, Fielding, Jr.

1823 Lucas, Fielding, Jr. – From Illinois, General Atlas Containing Distinct Maps of All the Known Countries in the World [Collection of Ulrich F. Danckers, M.D.].

Excerpt of Fielding Lucas’ map of 1823, showing that the subdivision into survey townships of 36 square miles each, mandated by the [see] Federal Land Ordinance of 1785, had been completed in the [see] Military Tract and the territory intended for IL & MI Canal construction and yielded by the Indians in the Treaty of St. Louis of 1816.

1825 Chicago Housing Map

1825 Chicago Housing Map – [Ulrich Danckers, 2000]

1830 Andreas, Alfred T. [1]

1830 Andreas, Alfred T. [1] – northern half of “A Map of Chicago in 1830” from Andreas` History of Chicago, From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, three volumes, published 1884 to 1888; for an enlarged detail of the central portion of this map see the entry `Andreas, Alfred Theodore` in the Encyclopedia section.

1830 Andreas, Alfred T. [2]

1830 Andreas, Alfred T. [2] – southern half of “A Map of Chicago in 1830” from Andreas` History of Chicago, From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, three volumes, published 1884 to 1888; for an enlarged detail of the central portion of this map see the entry `Andreas, Alfred Theodore` in the Encyclopedia section.

1830 Harrison, Frederick

1830 Harrison, Frederick – Map of the Mouth of the Chicago River, drawn in February 1830 by [see] U.S. Civil engineer F. Harrison, Jr. for the purpose of showing the proposed harbor improvements. A printed copy can be found in the History of Cook County, Illinois by A.T. Andreas.

1830 Thompson, James

1830 Thompson, James – Plat of the Original Town, Chicago [authenticated MS copy, 1837; Chicago History Museum Library].

1831 Herrington, James

1831 Herrington, James – “Greater Chicago in 1831.”

1832 Rose, Col. Edwin

1832 Rose, Col. Edwin – This Black Hawk War pen and ink manuscript map [24.4 x 20.1 cm] was drawn by [see in Encyclopedia section] Colonel Rose, a veteran of the war; it is now kept at the Chicago History Museum Library. See Black Hawk War for additional detail.

1833 Conley, Walter M. & Seltzer, O.E.

1833 Conley, Walter M. & Seltzer, O.E. – A Map of Chicago: Incorporated as a town August 5, 1833.

Shown here is an excerpt of this retrospective map that was created in 1933 in collaboration with Caroline McIlvaine of the Chicago Historical Society. The complete map can be viewed in Robert Holland’s book Chicago in Maps. [342a]

1834 Hathaway, Joshua, Jr.

1834 Hathaway, Joshua, Jr. – Chicago with the School Section, Wabansia and Kinzie`s Addition.

The first printed map of Chicago produced by the lithographer Peter A. Mesier, New York. The printing was prompted by the escalating Chicago real estate boom and the map is based on the surveys of the original town plat and of the three new additions [map provided courtesy of The Philadelphia Print Shop, Ltd.; eds.].

1834 Post Offices Map

1834 Post Offices Map – This map shows the early post office locations. [Ulrich Danckers, 2000]

1834 Wright, John Stephen

1834 Wright, John Stephen – Chicago.

The second lithographic map of Chicago, published by the firm Peter E. Meisner in New York, as was the [see] Hathaway map. Wright made a fortune in Chicago real estate, only to lose the money in the crash of 1837.

1834 Irwin, Lt. J.R.

1834 Irwin, Lt. J.R. – Map and Profile of the proposed Route of the Michigan and Illinois Canal.

Shown here is an excerpt of a map of the proposed Illinois & Michigan Canal territory, drawn by Irwin in 1834 from survey records of the early 1830s by the civil engineers [see] William B. Guyon, Frederick Harrison, Jr., and Henry Belin, and then printed as a government document. The complete map covers territory from Lake Michigan to the Illinois River, while the excerpt shown here concentrates on the Chicago area. The complete map can be viewed in Robert Holland’s book Chicago in Maps. [342a]

1834 Wright, John Stephen

1834 Wright, John Stephen – Chicago.

The manuscript map on which, in addition to other drafts, the [see] final lithographic map Chicago by Wright was based and was printed in the same year.

1835 "We look about town."

1835 “We look about town.” – This 1835 map of early Chicago housing distribution was assembled by Ron Mounce from information provided by Edwin O. Gale in his book, Reminiscenses of Early Chicago and Vicinity. [266]